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Posts tagged "Tourist Criminal Defense"

Is a DUI your surprise souvenir from a Florida vacation?

When you scheduled your Florida vacation, you probably hoped to come home with an incredible tan. Instead, you ended up in legal trouble and came back with pending charges in another state. That can be an incredibly scary situation. One of the most common legal issues for tourists involves driving under the influence charges. While Florida has similar legal limits for alcohol when compared with other states, it's easier to make bad decisions when you're kicking back on your vacation.

Traveling with firearms across state lines

Traveling from state to state is often more complicated for gun owners. Different states maintain separate firearm ownership laws, and may or may not recognize the ownership and carrying permits issued by another state, among other things. If you're hoping to travel to Florida from another state with a firearm, be sure to take several precautions.

Public intoxication can mean real criminal charges

Daytona enjoys a rich reputation as a party city that welcomes tourists to come enjoy the diverse nightlife it has to offer. However, some tourists may find themselves on the wrong side of the law if their nightlife (or daytime) activities lead to public intoxication. As a tourist in Daytona, do you really need to worry about public intoxication charges?

Tourists must defend their rights against unlawful search

Florida enjoys a reputation as a party state to much of the rest of the country, and while the reputation is deserved in many respects, it doesn't mean that anything goes in the Sunshine State. Many tourists assume that because of this reputation and the fact that Florida has now legalized medical marijuana use that police simply don't care about a tourist carrying some marijuana on his or her person or in his or her car. Unfortunately, this type of behavior can still lead to charges that may entail very high penalties.

Tourists and self-defense against assault

In only a little while, Biketoberfest will be here again, bringing with it thousands of bikers, beer chugging and raucous good times. Of course, there is always the possibility that things might get out of hand during the festival, and an act of violence might take place. If violence does occur, the individuals involved may face assault charges. These individuals would want to make sure that they have proper guidance from an attorney who understands how to defend against assault charges, and also understands how to defend tourists.

Does Florida have zero tolerance laws?

For those over 21, DUI laws typically center around the .08 blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit. Adult drivers who show slight traces of alcohol -- perhaps from having a beer with dinner -- may not wind up with a DUI as long as they're not impaired.

Why was I charged with drinking in public?

The law has always been quite unclear as to whether it is permissible to drink in public. The uncertainty regarding this matter is a big reason why people get charged with illegally consuming alcoholic beverages in public. This matter all comes down to what is known as the open container law. These open container laws vary greatly depending where you are in a city or state.

Is being drunk a defense to a criminal act?

As a tourist, there may be times that you're not familiar with the laws of the locations you visit. That doesn't excuse you from breaking the law, but it can sometimes work in your defense. One thing that you shouldn't try to do is to explain your actions away by stating that you were drunk.

Arrested for illegal fireworks in Florida? I can help

Many out-of-state tourists are spending this Fourth of July weekend on vacation in Daytona Beach. The state of Florida thrives on the tourism industry, so it's important that visitors to the Sunshine State understand that the laws here may be different from those in their home states.

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