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Public intoxication can mean real criminal charges

Daytona enjoys a rich reputation as a party city that welcomes tourists to come enjoy the diverse nightlife it has to offer. However, some tourists may find themselves on the wrong side of the law if their nightlife (or daytime) activities lead to public intoxication. As a tourist in Daytona, do you really need to worry about public intoxication charges?

Practically speaking, yes. Public intoxication charges can result from a number of different circumstances, and in some ways may serve as a broad net to catch a variety of individuals who let the party get a bit out of hand. Of course, like all tourism-dependent cities, public intoxication is usually a situational call for the law enforcement officer issuing the charges.

In some cases, public intoxication charges may arise even if individuals are not physically in a public space if they are visible to the public. For instance, if a person were to behave in a disorderly fashion while in the publicly-visible window of his or her hotel room, public intoxication charges may result. Similarly, in some cases, public intoxication charges may arise even if without any determination of the physical intoxication of the suspect. Simply acting intoxicated, even if a person is technically not, can still produce public intoxication charges.

If you face public intoxication charges, you may have many more ways to fight the charges than you immediately realize. It is difficult to determine the strengths of your particular case without reviewing the specifics of your individual charges. With a professional defense, you can focus on getting your vacation back on track and protecting your rights and freedoms in the process.

Source: Findlaw, "How Serious Is a Public Intoxication Charge?," accessed Oct. 27, 2017

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